Can Hormones Cause Hair Loss?

There are many possible causes of hair loss – chemotherapy treatment, mental disorders such as trichotillomania, alopecia, thyroid disease, extreme stress, hair damage, having a baby and many more. As such, it can be difficult to pinpoint the exact cause of hair loss, which is why it’s important to discuss the matter with a trusted physician. Today, we’re going to discuss hormonal hair loss.

hormonal hair loss

What is hormonal hair loss?

As detailed in Women’s Health, hormonal hair loss occurs when one experiences a decline in the hormones that promote hair growth, and an increase in the hormones that cause hair loss. This imbalance causes hair to enter the telogen phase, which is a resting phase in which hair is released and subsequently falls out. Normally, hair follicles enter this phase at different times, but with hormonal hair loss, most or all of the hair is pushed into the telogen phase at the same time, and hair loss is significant.

 

What causes hormonal hair loss?

There are many possible reasons for this, generally falling into two categories: medical or trauma. In the former, a disease-triggered hormonal imbalance is the reason for the hair loss. In the latter, an event or change – such as surgery, significant weight loss, severe trauma or something similar – triggers the hormonal shift.

 

How can hormonal hair loss be reversed?

If your hair loss is caused by a disease, seeking treatment is the first step. You may be put on a medication that regulates hormones, such as progesterone. In any case, adopting a healthier lifestyle – through nutrition, exercise, meditation and other forms of stress relief – can help reduce the total shedding time and encourage regrowth sooner.

 

Whatever the cause of your hormonal hair loss, DK International can help! At our discrete Bloomington hair loss salon, our dedicated experts can help you find a solution – whether it is wigs, hair solutions, hairsystems or another option – that fits your needs and budget. Give us a call at 952-934-8336 to set up a free consultation.

The Hair Growth Cycle

In order to have an awareness of hair loss, it’s important to understand the hair growth cycle. This will allow you to pinpoint any abnormalities in your hair growth and loss, and can potentially help to determine the cause of any excessive hair loss.

There are three distinct stages of the hair growth cycle: the anagen phase, the catagen phase and the telogen phase. When one or more of these phases is disrupted due to a medical condition, stress, trauma or some other reason, hair loss can result.

hair growth cycle

 

Anagen Phase

This is the growth phase. In general, hair grows about half an inch per month, and often grows faster in the summer months than in the winter (likely due to the climate and increased absorption of vitamin D and others). On average, the anagen phase lasts between three and five years. If a hair was allowed to grow for the full phase, it could reach up to 30 inches.

 

Catagen Phase

There is no significant change to the hair during this phase. Instead, it is a relatively short transitional phase, and usually lasts about 10 days.

 

Telogen Phase

This is known as a resting phase. It is the time during which hair is released, and falls out. It is normal to lose up to 80 hairs every day. Since each hair on your head is at a different stage of the hair growth cycle, you likely won’t notice those lost hairs. However, if you notice more strands in your brush or the shower drain, it’s a sign of abnormal hair loss.

Following the telogen phase, hair follicles remain inactive for about three months. The hair growth cycle then restarts with the anagen phase.

 

If you are concerned about abnormal hair loss, it’s a good idea to contact your physician and determine whether any underlying medical issues are the cause.

At DK International, we understand that hair loss can be a very difficult and stressful experience. We offer a variety of hair replacement and restoration services. Contact us today for a free private consultation at our Minneapolis hair loss salon.

Three Products for Thinning Hair

Thinning hair or complete hair loss can be a difficult emotional hurdle to overcome. Hair is a big part of our physical and mental identity, and hair loss can put a shadow over everyday life. DK International exists to help men, women and children who are experiencing hair loss, whether caused by chemotherapy, alopecia or a similar disease, age, stress or some other reason. We work to find hair solutions that fit our clients’ lifestyle and budget.

thinning hair

 

XFusion

If you are experiencing hair loss, you have several options to slow, reverse or cover your thinning hair. For those suffering from minimal hair loss, XFusion may be a great solution. Using keratin fibers that intertwine and bind with remaining hair, XFusion covers and camouflages hair loss. The fibers stick to hair through a magnetic connection created by static. XFusion can be used on small, specific areas throughout the hair, and it is resistant to wind and water.

 

Cyberhair

One of our favorite new hair loss solutions is the Cyberhair system, a newly-developed micro point solution for hair loss and thinning hair. Cyberhair replicates natural hair texture, and is lightweight and long-lasting. In addition, Cyberhair doesn’t use any chemicals or glue. This makes it one of the healthies hair replacement options on the hair replacement market today.

 

Wigs

For substantial or complete hair loss, wigs are a great solution. Don’t be afraid – wigs have come a long way! At our Bloomington wig salon, we offer a wide selection of tasteful, natural wigs. Make a private appointment today to see all available options.

 

Not sure which of our hair replacement solutions is right for you? Let us help! Our experienced professionals will go over our full product line and help you determine which best fits your needs and your budget. Give us a call at 952-934-8336 to schedule an appointment at our discrete Twin Cities hair replacement service salon.

Is Your Hair Loss Normal?

If you’ve recently noticed a few extra hair strands on your pillow or in your hairbrush, you may be concerned about abnormal hair loss. But how can you tell if your hair loss is normal, or if it’s a cause for concern?

abnormal hair loss

According to Women’s Health, the average person loses between 60 and 100 strands of hair every day, so some hair loss is certainly normal. But if you’re losing more than that on a daily basis, it may indicate that something more serious is going on. We’ve written several blog posts on diseases that cause hair loss, but the first step, in any case, is to check in with your doctor. This is especially true if the hair loss has been going on for more than three months.

But how can you track your hair loss to see how much you’re losing?

There are three good methods:

  1. Pillow watch, or monitoring the amount of new hairs on your pillow every morning.
  2. Keeping a closer eye on your hairbrush, by cleaning it out every evening and monitoring it the following day.
  3. Watching for patterns of loss in your hair, such as baldness on the top of your head or a receding hairline.

If you do notice abnormal hair loss, take a closer look at your lifestyle. Have you been under an unusual amount of stress? Has your diet changed? Have you been chemically processing or heat treating your hair? Did you recently have a baby? All of these can trigger abnormal hair loss, so try making a few adjustments to see if that helps your hair.

If you’re experiencing chronic, long-term hair loss, our Minneapolis hair restoration and hair replacement service may be for you. Get in touch with our experienced and compassionate professionals to discuss hair extensions, wigs and hair solutions, hairsystems and more.

Chemotherapy and Hair Loss

Hair loss is one of the most well-known and most feared side effects of chemotherapy. And for good reason – the majority of men and women who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience some degree of hair loss. But everyone who undergoes chemo experiences hair loss differently, so it’s difficult to know what to expect or how to mentally prepare for it.

 

In general, hair loss usually begins with two to four weeks of starting chemotherapy treatment. The loss doesn’t just occur on the head, but can affect hair all over the body, including eyelashes and eyebrows.

 

chemo and hair loss

 

Sometimes, hair falls out in clumps, while it is sometimes more gradual – you might just notice more strands in your brush and hair that is thinning overall. Depending on the severity and pattern of your hair loss, you may decide to shave your head before it is completely gone, or simply style it in a way that masks some of the loss.

 

The hair loss will generally continue for the duration of the chemo treatment and for a few weeks after it ends. Hair usually regrows within six months, and it may come in with a different color or texture, because the cells that control the pigment of your hair are not yet functioning. As such, this is usually a temporary change.

 

So is there a way to prevent hair loss caused by chemotherapy? Unfortunately, there is not. Some drugs are more likely to cause hair loss than others, and the level of loss may also be affected by the dosage and duration of treatment. Your doctor should be able to help you prepare for hair loss as a possible side effect of chemotherapy.

 

Going through chemotherapy is difficult for many reasons, and hair loss can add a significant mental burden to an already difficult time. Make sure that you have support during this tough time.

 

If you’re experiencing hair loss caused by chemotherapy or radiation, DK International can help. At our discrete Twin Cities hair loss salon, our experienced and compassionate hair restoration experts can help you find an answer for your hair loss, whether you’re interested in wigs, hairsystems, or other hair solutions. Contact us today for a free consultation.

Hair Loss vs. Hair Shedding

Adults generally lose between 50 and 100 strands of hair every day, so it’s not uncommon to see a decent amount of hair in your brush or on your pillow. But if you’re losing more hair than normal, that may be a sign of hair shedding or hair loss. But what’s the difference?

 

hair shedding

 

Although both share similar symptoms, hair loss and hair shedding are unique afflictions, with time being the main difference between the two. Hair shedding usually has a set duration, while hair loss is a much longer-term issue. This is because hair shedding is usually connected to a life change, event or stressor, while hair loss can have many potential causes.

 

So, when that stressing event ends, the shedding stops. (Of course, if the stressor continues, the shedding will likely continue as well, and can be a long-term affliction in some cases.) Hair will likely regain its normal fullness in 6 to 9 months after the shedding ends.

 

Hair shedding is often connected to:

  • The birth of a child
  • Significant weight loss
  • A high fever or surgical operation, or recovering from an illness
  • Significant stress

In comparison, hair loss can have a variety of causes, including:

  • Chemotherapy, radiation or another medical treatment or drug
  • Diseases, such as alopecia, thyroid disease and lupus, among others
  • Mental disorders, such as trichotillomania
  • Genetics
  • Overly harsh hair treatment

If you’re not sure whether you’re experiencing hair shedding or hair loss, visit your doctor or see a dermatologist to get a diagnosis. There may be a way to treat either your hair or the underlying cause.

 

At DK International, we offer a variety of hair replacement services, including hairsystems, hair extensions, wigs and hair solutions. If you’re facing long-term hair shedding or loss, give our Minneapolis hair restoration experts a call to set up a free consultation. We can customize a solution to fit your budget and needs.

Treatment Options for Trichotillomania

Unlike the other diseases we’ve recently detailed on our blog, today we’re going to discuss a mental ailment. Trichotillomania is a mental disorder that can result in patchy bald spots on the scalp and hair loss on other parts of the body. As such, the emotional and social effects of the disease are often debilitating.

Also known as hair-pulling disorder, trichotillomania causes a repeated, irresistible urge to pull out one’s own hair. This is not limited to the hair on the head, but can also include eyebrows or hair on other parts of the body. People with trichotillomania are unable to stop themselves from pulling out their hair, despite wanting and trying to.

trichotillomania

There is no known cause for trichotillomania, but certain factors – such as age, family history and stress level – may increase the risk of diagnosis. Some infants engage in hair-pulling, but it usually goes away naturally as they age. Pre-teens between 10 and 13 are most likely to be diagnosed with trichotillomania, and people with a family history of the disease tend to be more prone to the disease.

Trichotillomania varies in severity – often, it is mild and manageable, but in many cases, the need to pull out hair is severe and overpowering. Some people pull hair intentionally, as a way of dealing with stress and tension. Many have elaborate rituals for hair-pulling. Alternatively, some people pull out hair automatically, without realizing that they’re doing it. This often occurs during times of boredom or inactivity.

There are treatment options, including therapy and antidepressants or other medications. Often, the loss of hair can lead to additional stress, making it important to treat the hair loss in addition to the underlying disease. Wigs or hair systems, as well as rejuvenation and micro point solutions may help to relieve some of the emotional impact of trichotillomania.

If you’re suffering from trichotillomania, get in touch with our discrete Minneapolis hair restoration salon to discuss your options.

All About Alopecia Areata

In our two-part series on diseases that can cause hair loss, we briefly discussed alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the hair follicles. Because alopecia areata is such a common cause of patchy hair loss and thinning hair, we thought it deserved a more in-depth discussion.

Although alopecia areata – which is more commonly referred to as simply alopecia – is relatively well-known, there are several aspects of the disease that are less commonly known or understood. We’ll focus on those in this post.

alopecia areata

First, alopecia areata does not only cause the loss of hair on the head. It can also cause hair on the face and, occasionally, other parts of the body.

Second, alopecia areata often makes its first appearance during childhood. The lifetime risk of being diagnosed with the disease is around 2 percent.

Third, alopecia areata is fairly common. It affects people of all ages and ethnic groups, and both men and women are at risk. The National Alopecia Areata Foundation estimates that as many as 6.8 million people in the United States have the disease.

Fourth, as a “polygenic disease,” both parents must contribute a set number of specific genes in order for their child to develop alopecia areata. Therefore, it is not a given that a parent with the disease will pass it to their children. It is also believed to be influenced by environmental factors, which makes the genetic risks of the disease more difficult to predict.

Finally, alopecia areata usually does not cause complete hair loss, but instead, causes hair to fall out in patches. (There is one form of the disease, called alopecia totalis, that does cause total hair loss, but that is less common.) The hair follicles remain alive, leaving the possibility of hair regrowth. In many cases, however, the disease often prevents hair from regrowing where it was previously lost, and hair that does regrow may fall out once again. This is where our Minneapolis hair restoration experts come in.

At DK International, we offer a variety of hair replacement services, including hairsystems, hair extensions, wigs and hair solutions. We can customize a solution to fit your budget and needs. Give our Bloomington, MN hair restoration experts a call to set up a free consultation.

Is Your Hair Loss a Symptom of Disease? (Part Two)

In our previous post, we covered a few of the diseases and disorders that can cause and contribute to hair loss. We’ll continue that series today by discussing three more.

 

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

When people talk about lupus, they are typically referring to systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE, as it’s the most common form of lupus. SLE is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks various parts of the body, thinking it’s fighting a foreign intruder. Hair loss is just one of the many symptoms of SLE, which vary depending on which part of the body the immune system attacks. SLE affects women more commonly than men.

hair loss diseases

Addison’s Disease

Addison’s disease occurs when the adrenal glands – which are located on top of the kidneys – don’t produce enough cortisol (which regulate the body’s reaction to stress) and aldosterone (which regulates sodium and potassium). Symptoms of the disease include hair loss, fatigue, muscle weakness, weight loss, low blood sugar, nausea and vomiting, irritability, depression and more. If Addison’s disease goes untreated, it can become life-threatening.

 

Systemic Sclerosis

Systemic sclerosis, or SS, is an autoimmune disorder in which collagen production is increased. This results in changes to the appearance and texture of skin, and possible harm to internal organs, muscles, blood vessels and the digestive system. Symptoms include hair loss, joint pain, calcium deposits or dilated blood vessels under the skin, diarrhea or constipation, and shortness of breath. SS may also be called scleroderma or CREST syndrome.

 

As you can see, hair loss is often one of the first symptoms of a wide variety of autoimmune disorders and other diseases. If you begin to notice hair loss, the first and most important thing to do is visit your doctor. If your hair loss is persistent or permanent, please get in touch with our Minnesota hair restoration and replacement service to discuss your options. At our discreet Minneapolis-area salon, we can discuss wigs, extensions, hairsystems and other hair replacement solutions that may be right for you.

Is Your Hair Loss a Symptom of Disease? (Part One)

On our blog, we’ve previously discussed thyroid disease (which includes hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease and others) and discussed how the disease could potentially cause hair loss. Unfortunately, thyroid disease is not the only ailment that can cause or worsen hair loss. There are a host of diseases that can impact hair health, and we’ll discuss a few in this two-part series.

diseases that cause hair loss

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks hair follicles, causing hair – usually on the scalp, but possibly on other areas of the body as well – to fall out in small patches. While alopecia areata usually does not result in complete hair loss, it may prevent hair from regrowing where it was lost. Even if the hair does grow back, it may fall out again.

There is no cure for alopecia areata, but there may be ways to regrow hair. Talk to one of our Minneapolis hair restoration experts to discuss your options.

 

Syphilis

Syphilis can be difficult to diagnose – it’s possible to have the disease for several years without showing any symptoms. This can cause it to be transmitted more often. More than 56,000 cases were reported in 2013, according to the CDC, making syphilis a fairly common disease.

Syphilis has four stages, and it is during the second stage that skin rashes and hair loss is common. These symptoms will go away regardless of whether you receive treatment, but it’s important to see your doctor and get treated before more serious and permanent harm is done.

 

Hypopituitarism

More often referred to as an underactive pituitary gland, hypopituitarism occurs when the pituitary gland – which is located on the underside of the brain – fails to release enough hormones. Underlying causes of hypopituitarism include brain, pituitary gland or hypothalamus tumors, or other diseases such as tuberculosis, stroke, sarcoidosis, hemochromatosis or others. In some cases, the cause may not be known.

Because there is no single causes of hypopituitarism, there is no set course of treatment. The disease is treated on a case by case basis, with an ultimate goal of restoring hormone levels.

 

Stay tuned for part two to learn more about diseases that cause and worsen hair loss.

 

If you’re dealing with hair loss, contact our discrete Bloomington, Minnesota hair restoration salon and schedule a free consultation. We carry a wide variety of hair systems, wigs, hair extensions and more. Our hair replacement professionals can help you to find the best solution for you.